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Old 02-05-2007, 01:43 PM   #1
progzilla
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Question double stroke bass drum technique

Hey I am new to the forum (obviously) but i wanted to learn how to do the double stroke roll with my bass drums.

What is the best way to learn? is there a video that a majority of you guys bought?

I really cant find anything...


thanks for your help

bruce


www.myspace.com/progzilla
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Old 02-05-2007, 01:48 PM   #2
morgenthaler
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Hi Progzilla!
Use the search button on this board, and page after page will reveal itself for your dedicated reading. Tons of posts on that subject. Welcome!
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Old 02-05-2007, 02:22 PM   #3
progzilla
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i did the search, and the advanced search... not one topic found! but i know thats wrong, i just dont know what i did wrong...
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Old 02-05-2007, 02:40 PM   #4
frank
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Hey Progzilla and welcome!

I searched "double stroke" and found this.
http://www.virgildonati.com/msgboar...searchid=220843

Hope this helps!

Good luck!
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Old 02-05-2007, 06:47 PM   #5
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dude i clicked on it and it said


Virgildonati.com Message

Sorry - no matches. Please try some different terms.
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Old 02-05-2007, 07:37 PM   #6
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The same principals apply to your feet that apply to your hands. Study the movements of your right foot, copy with left foot. It has taken me at least 5 years to get this down to a useable part of my playing. As you would do for a normal double with the right foot, i.e. the first stroke as you pick your leg up, the second on the way down is very important. Getting the left leg to do the same is the trick. use your ankles like your wrist. When you play a double with your hands you dont lift yor whole arm from the elbow two times. Same goes for your legs, stomping your foot down two times is a huge waste of motion. Check out the "single stroke roll" vid, watch Virgils legs, the faster he goes, the less leg movement there is, he transfers the strokes from his legs to his ankles. One tip is to start jumping rope, use ankles to jump, not knees and hips. This not only gives you muscle memory, but also the power. Good luck, be patient. Anything is possible IF you PUT IN THE TIME .
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Old 02-06-2007, 10:00 PM   #7
Adam
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Pcannon

Are you Pete in disguise? This advice was awsome man.

He's dead on the mark about using ankles like your wrists.

I've gotta get me a jumping rope and try that!
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Old 02-07-2007, 06:22 AM   #8
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My name is pete, but I am not peter from this forum. He's the master of advice. Im just a crusty 39 year old who started playing at the age of 8, and started teaching at age 16.I just really like to share on this forum what I've learned over the years because here it's like everyones buddys! Its very possitive! My good pal Thomas lang tipped me off to the jump rope thing, it really works!
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Old 02-07-2007, 09:45 AM   #9
Adam
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haha. Hey pcannon, a rather odd question:

Do you drum professionally, or in any way use drumming as a profession? I'm wondering because when I'm 39, if I'm not at least teaching drums I often wonder if I'll want to do it at all...I love drums with such a passion, but when I'm doing things that aren't drumming (like work, but thank the Lord I just got a job teaching!) I feel like I'm wasting my time. Drumming then to me tends to demand all my focus, or else become a monster to me when I'm working at 7-11 or something. Unless drumming was my career it would haunt me that it wasn't haha

So I suppose my real question is what's it like to be a 39 year old drummer? What's the journey like? You don't really have to answer this dumb question haha. God bless
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Old 02-07-2007, 02:17 PM   #10
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Adam

Your comment about age is interesting. I'm in my mid forties and the best way I can describe my passion for drumming is this. It's alot like golf in the fact that you will never truly master it. As long as you understand that fact, the desire and exitement of learning new things will keep it fresh for as long as you play.
Just my opinion.

Regards
Octaplus
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Old 02-07-2007, 07:28 PM   #11
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Well, I've pretty much made my living playing drums, I've played on 31 albums to date, I've had some of my music used on T.V.(Sunset beach) I've played just about every weekend since the age of 16. Just like any job you have your ups and downs.It is possible to raise a family, live a "normal" life playing drums. Its a LOT of work keeping your nose to the grind stone. But by staying away from the pitfalls of the business and suplimenting being a musician with sound engineering,producing and teaching ( and BAD grammar) You can do it too! Even after 31 years of playing, my daily routine includes at least 3 hours a day of practice! It's all about time management. In short you can spend 3 hours on the computer or parked in front of the T.V. or you can practice. I've had students in the past who were great at video games, but could not understand why they dont improve on drums. Its where you put your energy. for me its a passion. Honestly, its been the one thing I can do better than most, only from many hours of hard work and dedication. Its become my identity. If you love it, you have "made it." Being on "CRIBS" is NOT making it, being on cribs only means your time on top is about to run out! Hehe. Famous does not mean "good." Remember that.
If you are not doing what you love deep down in your soul, your wasting your life.
So Adam,you have a lot to look forward to! I've seen alot and done alot because of music. Not a single regret.
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Old 02-08-2007, 09:11 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pcannon
Well, I've pretty much made my living playing drums, I've played on 31 albums to date, I've had some of my music used on T.V.(Sunset beach) I've played just about every weekend since the age of 16. Just like any job you have your ups and downs.It is possible to raise a family, live a "normal" life playing drums. Its a LOT of work keeping your nose to the grind stone. But by staying away from the pitfalls of the business and suplimenting being a musician with sound engineering,producing and teaching ( and BAD grammar) You can do it too! Even after 31 years of playing, my daily routine includes at least 3 hours a day of practice! It's all about time management. In short you can spend 3 hours on the computer or parked in front of the T.V. or you can practice. I've had students in the past who were great at video games, but could not understand why they dont improve on drums. Its where you put your energy. for me its a passion. Honestly, its been the one thing I can do better than most, only from many hours of hard work and dedication. Its become my identity. If you love it, you have "made it." Being on "CRIBS" is NOT making it, being on cribs only means your time on top is about to run out! Hehe. Famous does not mean "good." Remember that.
If you are not doing what you love deep down in your soul, your wasting your life.
So Adam,you have a lot to look forward to! I've seen alot and done alot because of music. Not a single regret.


Hey pcannon, I am just wondering, how did you start teaching at 16? I mean, how did you get students and what did you focus on when you taught them? Also, do you think that going to a music school (ala berklee) is necessary to be able to teach drum lessons? Are there any drum teachers who actually teach drummers how to teach?

I am trying to get into teaching lessons to kids, but like most of us, I dont have enough money to go to a music school.

thanks.
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Old 02-08-2007, 12:57 PM   #13
Jameson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pcannon
( and BAD grammar)


!

You're a great guy, pcannon. Thanks for sharing all this.
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Old 02-10-2007, 12:54 AM   #14
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Pete is the best of the best.

He's a credit to this forum IMO.
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Old 02-11-2007, 07:15 AM   #15
pcannon
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HOLY COW! I thought you fell off the planet CJC! Great to see ya back here!
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