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Old 12-12-2003, 11:03 AM   #1
Brobjer
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My Eliminator sucks! :/

G'day folks!

I have always had Pearl pedals and they have worked 'ok', but always when I have played on Yamah pedals, I have had MUCH more control and increased speed. I bought an Eliminator a year ago and thought it would be excellent because of all the good critiques it has received. Although, I have had A LOT of trouble with it and it has never been a good allround pedal. Actually, if I'd compare it to an old Yamaha pedal, the Yamaha is much better for me in all ways.
I've tried everything on my Pearl, but I can never get what I want. I believe the pedal is a vital ingredisnce for a relaxed and non-tense playing. My playing gets a loss with the Eliminator under my feet and I can't understand why!
Everyone say it's the best, but for me it's the worst.. The same for Iron Cobras. Both don't fit my feet and my foot technique is improved a lot with other pedals :/:/

I guess I'll either try the Axis or buy a Yamaha twinpedal.
What do you feel?

- Brobjer

PS: Where have Peter gone? Haven't heard from the man in a while!
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Old 12-12-2003, 02:14 PM   #2
jasonmw_nf
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In the eliminators defense....I have one and I LOVE IT!! i guess its just like everything else in life, all a matter of personal preference. I find it to be extremely smooth and responsive. just a note, i have the strap drive. What one do you have Brobjer? Maybe that'll make a difference if you try the opposite of what you have?
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Old 12-12-2003, 02:29 PM   #3
Brobjer
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I have the strap drive too. It's the first strap pedal I've owned. Anyway, I didn't feel any huge difference between the chain and strap.
But I mean, the Eliminator is made in the way where you can simulate many different pedals with all the cleaver features, but I have tried every combination possible but can't get near the feel of the Yamahas. It pretty strange.
The only type I haven't 'tried' yet is the direct link pedals such as the Axis, Flying Dragon and DW9000. I have heard that it's a huge difference there and that you either like it or hate it.

Brobjer
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Old 12-12-2003, 10:44 PM   #4
jagdkommando
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I also play the pearl eliminator pedals and I love them althaugh I'm not 100% convinced about the left one. I feel a difference between left and right pedal. When I played on Virg's pedals in november (he allowed me to play) I found out that his pedals both feel the same. I don't know how he was able to cinfigure'em like that. Moreover they looked a little bit different. Maybe they are a newer edition then mine?

I also tried Iron Cobra ... but I wasn't happy with those.
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Old 12-12-2003, 10:48 PM   #5
alencore
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I can relate to you in terms of the Yamaha, dw and Iron Cobras.

I owned a these classic Yamaha twin pedal for years and boy, they are really sturdy and feels good on the feet. On Iron Cobras it's the same thing except I don't like some of it's design concerning sturdyness.
DW pedals are great as well.

I had some experience with older models of pearl double pedals and frankly I wasn't happy with them.

If I had the money to buy new pedals I would either go to the latest model of Yamaha or DW.
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Old 12-13-2003, 06:26 AM   #6
STAVROPOULOS
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hello guys!
well,i cannot say anything about these pedals,cause i have never played on them!but i own the MAPEX p980,which is MAPEX's best pedal as i saw in the website of the company.my teacher has made the adjustments and these pedals seem to be really nice!if i were you,i would go in a shop and try many different pedals,to see which works best!
by the way,with p980 you can play not only on a single bass drum,but on two too!try them if you like brobjer.
jagdkommando how and where did you play on virgil's pedals?
bye guys!
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Old 12-13-2003, 06:43 AM   #7
Brobjer
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@Jagdkommando: How was his pedals adjusted (springtension, cams, powershifter, beater hight and distance.)

Thx,
Andreas
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Old 12-13-2003, 02:54 PM   #8
maggimus
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I'm with U Jagdkommando...I can feel the difference btween my right and left eliminator pedals..and I've also tried Virgil's eliminators and they feel MUCH better than mine do...!!??? ..C'mon Virg...give us some tips...what's your secret?
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Old 12-13-2003, 06:34 PM   #9
peter
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I am still around. It's been real
busy around my house, everyone
having gotten sick but let me try
and help you along with this.

Please read my exchanges with
Tommy G., who has looked into
and purchased the Axis-A Long-
board pedals, which I also own,
as well as Eliminators.

What exactly is the issue with
these? What is it about the Yam-
aha's that you like over the Pearl
pedals? Of course, it's about what
you want and what feels right.

Tell me what you want from your
pedal. Tell me if you like tension
or if you don't. Tell me about the
footboard height. It could be the
size of the footboard too.

I want to know where you have
all your settings, including beat-
er distance, color cam, spring-
tension and Power-Shifter. How
big is your foot? Where are you
depressing the beater?

It may be time to re-examine your
technique too. Tell me everything
that you can.

Let's talk about it. I'll try an help.
I agree. The pedal is EVERTYHING.

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Last edited by peter : 12-13-2003 at 06:49 PM.
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Old 12-13-2003, 06:50 PM   #10
alencore
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Oh yeah! Good old Pete the true "Drum Therapist" here hitting the right spot on choices of words there.

He even rights them in verses almost like reading drum poetic stuff...hehe.

You rule PETE!!!
Love yah Man!!!
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Old 12-13-2003, 06:50 PM   #11
peter
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Read what Tom said about the
Twin-Pedal drive shafts. This is
VERY important.
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Old 12-14-2003, 03:54 AM   #12
Brobjer
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@Peter:

Here are all my settings: Powershifter in position 2 (middle). My beater hight is appr. in the middle of the head, that is not all the way up and the 'stick' is attached an inch below the top position. The spring tension is set pretty high, but not all the way up. I adjusted the pedal board hight right on top of the cams (blue) and because of the beater being adjusted pretty far from the head, I have adjusted the pedalboard at the lowest point. I have pretty big feet and around 12.

I looked at some pics of Virgil's pedals and I see that his beaters are adjusted pretty close to the head and the pedalboard is very low. I noticed the same goes for Simon Phillips.

I can adjust my pedals so they feel the same by putting them right next to eachother and not turning the left pedal. This is the real disadvantage of having twinpedals, because with two singles you can put them in different degrees from eachother and still have the same feel.
I know I can adjust it in an excellent way, but not how. It feels bad to get rid of such a good pedal because of lack of adjustmentknowledge.
The Yamahas all feel good in any adjustments. I donät know if I should change beater to maybe Iron Cobra beaters of Axis beaters. Would that make any difference?
I have also noticed that my pedal is too 'small' for my BD hoop. It doesn't get close enough and it should strike the head when it's 100% horisontical, but I still have a few °'s to push until it strikes. Should I make the hoop smaller? I now have a Premier Artist Birch kit, and I saw that Virgil had the exact same before, AND with the Eliminators so I shouldn't be this way, should it?

Thanks for all your help guys. I really appreciate it!

Brobjer

Last edited by Brobjer : 12-14-2003 at 08:12 AM.
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Old 12-14-2003, 11:07 AM   #13
peter
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Don't worry about what Virgil is doing.
His feet are much smaller than yours.

I would try adjust your Power-Shifter
all the way forward, for starters. The
closer to the kick you are, the better
the pullback and action.

That should allow you to loosen the
springs. I have found Yamaha action
to be very easy. The springs that they
are using are basically, pretty similar.
They both have the uni-clamps too.

Another thing I would try is going all
the to the beginning, with the least
spring tension, FIRST and then work-
ing it up, as needed. While you are
very loose in tension, bring your
beaters back, away from the head.
Bring the beater closer to the head,
as the tension is increased.

I'm not sure if you have enough
power in your stroke or if it's the
action that you need but remember
that your cams are set from action
to power - red to black.

Make your adjustments slowly and
very gradually, in order to allow you
every possible option.

Let's see.
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Old 01-18-2004, 07:46 AM   #14
The_Setite
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Hey guys,
I feel that footboard size is a mojor issue regarding double and single pedals. Foot boards should, I feel be BIG, enough to place your whole foot on and then some. Width is also an issue. Wider is better as it gives more support. This trend of small, flashy shaped footboards is purely an aesthetic serving no practical advantage. In my opinion the Axis longboard is the best pedal in existence. I also own a DW 5000 and a Pearl powershifter. The axis has the least "gimmicks" (powershifter footplate.....makes no difference at all to your playing ) and works the best (power and technique translation) The large footboard allows you to play heels up, heels down or heel toe easily. Smaller footplates compromise certainly the last technique especially if you have big feet (like me!) Brobjer, if you buy another pedal, have a look at Gibralter, as the design in all pedals is essentially the same, but the Gibralter footboards are BIG and very comfortable. I own a Gibralter hi hat and the footplate is extremely comfortable and translates my technique perfectly. Thoughts??
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Old 01-18-2004, 10:10 AM   #15
alencore
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I must say, I can't help but agree on most what The_Setite posted above. although my technique on pedals really doesn't require a longer foot plate but i really hate those of Tama as my shoes always get tangled on the darn logos on it's footplates as i do the slide up technique.

they shld start adding another option of some kind of mechanical adjustment for the the foot plate to adjust it's length and no darn protruding logos.
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