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Old 07-04-2004, 01:56 PM   #1
Lad.
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Do's and Do not's of intricate double bass

Just to get things cleared up, so that I can start practicing my double bass rudiments better, what are some of the things that are definite do's and do not's when dealing with this type of matter? I find myself trying to do moderate double strokes with my feet, and it just doesn't go smoothly. The ankle is needed for this, but there's a problem. I'm holding my legs up while I do it and knocks my balance outta wack. Trying to do this for me feels like trying to Riverdance with a gorilla on my back, since the legs are so much heavier than the arms. Anything I can do to help my playing better? Comments would be much appreciated.
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Old 07-04-2004, 08:58 PM   #2
peter
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Doing doubles with a the double-pedals
is like doing doubles with a single-pedal,
except twice. Somehow, I think that we
can forget that.

The same things that work for the single
work for the double. We have to use that
left-foot. We have to practice, with it
leading. You have to develop it.

I have said it before. Explore the foot-
board and consider placing your feet in
different zones. You may find, like I have,
that the lower 3rd of it can allow for
easier doubling.

Don't give up. Don't say you can't do
it because you can. You'll see.
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Old 07-04-2004, 10:54 PM   #3
Lad.
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I know I can, of course, but it seems like there's just something that's not right about the way I play my double bass.
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Old 07-05-2004, 03:53 AM   #4
C.J.
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Being destabilized is normal, what many peopole forget is that drumming is a question of balance. I used to get frustrated because I could not do many things du to a lack of balance, you have to be patient and wait for you body to get use to the position... Keep on at it and it will quickly cme to you.
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Old 07-05-2004, 04:13 AM   #5
Lad.
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I've learned a lot of double bass stuff in a little over a year. Though I have been playing for about 4 years or so, I got my double bass in 2003 ( man, I'm so unsure of these dates )
and if I've learned what I have within a year or so, then just watch if I give it a good three more years to develope.
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Old 07-05-2004, 05:40 AM   #6
Johnny
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First, check your seat height. Your thighs should be near parallel to the ground.
Second, make sure you aren't leaning back. I've found that if I tell students to feel as if they're leaning forward, they actually just sit up straight.
Third, make sure you're letting your rear end support you and not your feet when you play.

You're going to need time to develop your lower abs and hips to get used to keeping your feet up. It just takes a little while. Remember that you don't need your heels to be way up, just a half-inch to an inch is fine.
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Old 07-05-2004, 05:47 AM   #7
Lad.
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I have my heels up as comfortable, so they can't be too high.
Also, I am somewhat guilty of letting my feet support some of my weight. Nobody ever told me that resting my foot on the beater was wrong in all 4 years of my self education, so it's more of a habit than an easy thing to do. Thank ya Johnny.
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Old 07-05-2004, 07:00 AM   #8
Johnny
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Your foot shouldn't leave the pedal, just don't rest all your weight on it.
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Old 07-05-2004, 08:15 AM   #9
C.J.
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Actually in my case that is the bad habbit I cought : my pedals a quite tight and I rest my weight on them, although The beaters do not touch the head. The thing is I have never had any problems with this "bad habit".
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Old 07-06-2004, 01:15 PM   #10
Lad.
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heh, I can't get my god damn spring tension tight enough to be able to do that, C.J.
I barely have to rest any weight on them at all to get them to touch the head. See, the thing about my pedals is I don't have them set right. I don't know how to set them the way I'll feel comfortable with them, so I just settle for which settings feel the least ****ty. If I go for a double hit with my right foot, I have to pound down with my whole leg the second hit in order for it to even hit the head. If I just try to get by with using most of my ankle, it comes up short and doesn't even touch it. It's almost like the spring tension is too low, the rebound is too much, and I think that I don't play double bass correctly.
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Old 07-06-2004, 02:30 PM   #11
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Hmmm... I don't know what to say actually, it may sound weird, but I just do not understand how some people do to not know how to set their pedals. I just went around messing with the pedals I got This (for the eliminators) :
- Foot board (power shifter) set up the highest;
- the strap is set up to the highest, you di this where the strap is nere the cams (now the foot board should be pretty high with thes to settings) ;
- Spring on tight;
- And I used the black cams.

Try it out, if you have any questions, I will try to answer, see how this set-up may work for you.
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Old 07-07-2004, 05:42 PM   #12
Kinetic drummer
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Talking

I HAD EXACTLY THE SAME PROBLEM

one method i used.. to make exercises do develop the heel-toe technique. steve smiths approach in his latest dvd can help.
also...
what i think will help you regardless of any pedal set up is to practice heel down. if you dont have a balance you cant play. you have to control the pedals not them to you.
so... practice heel down... and then.. move your heel to a side. in order to have it pedal free. i mean without touching the plate of the pedal, just your toe. with time... you will develop your control which will give you for sure; speed. im still practicing this

a good exercise im doing is this...

TRIPLETS


----3----- ------3------ ----3----- -----3------
R L L R L L R L L R L R

-----3--- -------3----- -----3---- ------3------
L R R L R R L R R L R L ... and so on

this is a nice two bar exercise.. which helps alot witn control and balance..
hope this help.. and be patient!
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Old 07-08-2004, 03:22 PM   #13
D. Slam
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lad.
Just to get things cleared up, so that I can start practicing my double bass rudiments better, what are some of the things that are definite do's and do not's when dealing with this type of matter? I find myself trying to do moderate double strokes with my feet, and it just doesn't go smoothly. The ankle is needed for this, but there's a problem. I'm holding my legs up while I do it and knocks my balance outta wack. Trying to do this for me feels like trying to Riverdance with a gorilla on my back, since the legs are so much heavier than the arms. Anything I can do to help my playing better? Comments would be much appreciated.


You have a control problem Lad. You're relying too much on your legs alone. If you watch Virgil when doing Double bass work, you will notice a combination of leg-lift and a rocking motion of the ankles. You're playing WAY too tight! Slow down and relax your movement.... Give your body time to physically develop to, then execute your mental concept of what you want.

Time, my friend! Patience, perseverance and TIME!

D.
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Last edited by D. Slam : 07-09-2004 at 10:21 AM.
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Old 07-09-2004, 05:09 PM   #14
Lad.
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I wouldn't use my legs at all if I could get my pedals comfortable.
It's almost like the tension is really too loose. However, I may try C.J's litte pointer.
I'm hoping that this does not turn into a crisis or anything ( ahh! )
Also, for D. Slam or C.J, either one...
Are my beaters supposed to be able to touch the head when I relax my foot on the pedal(s) ?
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Old 07-09-2004, 05:11 PM   #15
Lad.
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Oh yes, and might I add.
C.J, how far are your beaters from the head? Mine are rather distant. This gives a good "thump" rather than a little "boink"
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