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Old 04-06-2004, 04:07 PM   #1
Lad.
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Untamed Style, self taught. Why!!

I've been playing drums since 2000, and it's come a long way. However, the style I go by is just wild and untamed. It's more like a solo style, that doesn't really sound impressive. I need guidance! I know finding a drumming teacher won't help, and I can't teach myself any worse than I already have.
Any suggestions on where to start, and how to get my style more "organized" ?
I mean, I can play these randomized solos like they're cake, but that's not what I want.
I'm stuck in a rut.
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Old 04-06-2004, 06:45 PM   #2
Lad.
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Well, the thing is, the old Motown beats and beatle records are things that I'm already sure I can handle.
I think that my mentality of it all is that I want to become as conditioned as I can to where I can pull of anything when someone asks it of me.
Then I will be able to not go Portnoy on everyone.
I mean, I could play a show of all straight out no-fills music, simply because I know they'd give me room for a 5 minute solo or so.
I just need simple guidance...and I'd better learn to read music soon.
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Old 04-17-2004, 09:19 AM   #3
duggano
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Hey,

It sounds like you need to make yourself adhere to stricter practise sessions and make yourself learn the building blocks of drums, this can be done without a teacher primarilarly. First you mustmustmust learn your rudiments. Practise them when youre sitting on the tube on your knees, on a practise pad whilst watching tv or just on your snare drum. If you can play a snare drum you can play any drum! Also then have in your practise a couple of pieces for snare drum, you can buy books for snare sight reading at different grades, start with grade 1 and work up. then have a book with drum kit in it, work on sight reading simple scores. Those are the essential building blocks of drummer, and having an organised practise will make you a better drummer from the first time you start doin it. So to sum up i would organise youre practise like this:

1. Rudiments on snare drum, getting progressively faster(dont move on till youve got that rudiment as good as it can be!)
2. Snare drum pieces, start at grade 1 and move up( if you live in england try and get hold of guildhall grades 1 and 2, its got an orange cover.
3. Get some books with kit pieces in them, stuff like rock school is ok but its best to find a associated board , where you can take fully fledged exams and the like.These boards also have very good books usually, guildhall, london college etc.)
4. Have some fun!! This should be the end of your practise so just stick a track on that you like and try and incorparate what you have learnt in the days session into the song.

Hope that helps, let em know if it helps your playing :-)

Dug

P.S this is a great site for rudiments http://drumsetc.tripod.com/drums/id4.html
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Old 04-18-2004, 03:51 PM   #4
Lad.
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Most of my rudiments are tops ( except for a few ) but most of what I need is a style.
I admire Virgil's style because it's so darn complex, but I also admire Tony Royster Jr.'s style because it's got a lot of UMPH to it. It's sort of a modern-jazzy form, from my perception.

After going to virgil's clinic, I've been checking out stuff I had never thought of before.
Layering, and triplet work have never crossed my mind.
I honestly think all I need is more knowledge of what can be done on a set.
Learning to read music better for me is a must as well. I'm having so much trouble layering a fivadiddle and a paradiddle that my wang almost falls off. It's terrible! I don't even know where to start with it all. First off, I want to get a new bass pedal. Second, I want to get more cymbals. Then, I want to start moving around the set with different patterns.
Any good suggestions for books with good drumkit excercises in them?
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Old 04-19-2004, 12:19 PM   #5
duggano
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good stuff there malt.

Also lad if youre struggling with virgils stuff which is understanable then try something eaisier. I mean theres no point in practising something which is out of your ability rang for the time being if you could be dedicating that practise time for other things. Have a try at some non virgil stuff then come back to it in a couple of months.

Dug
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Old 04-19-2004, 11:22 PM   #6
Lad.
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The key to learning the fivadiddle / paradiddle layer pattern is to practice the everloving crap out of it. Eventually, the different sides of my body will be able to think on seperate levels.
Anyway...
I truly think I'm capable of anything on drums, but with all other things, it comes with practice.
I have been practicing my singles strokes like crazy, in order to get them bullet fast.
I have been trying to get my double bass to go as fast as I can get it while still being audible and understandable.
Aside from that, in order to get myself used to the fivadiddle / paradiddle layer pattern, I have been trying to make my right hand tap at a constant beat, while doing the fivadiddles with my left hand and left foot.
I'm still having trouble with that, but I'll work my way up.
ANYWAY...about my style. It is true that I learn from other artists. I usually don't get a new idea until I see another artist do it. It makes me feel like somewhat of a copycat, but where else am I going to learn?
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Old 05-15-2004, 07:10 AM   #7
hi1000
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wow... this thread is for me too
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Old 05-15-2004, 08:38 AM   #8
shaftninja
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lad.
The key to learning the fivadiddle / paradiddle layer pattern is to practice the everloving crap out of it. Eventually, the different sides of my body will be able to think on seperate levels.

A few things that helped my brain and muscle memory process the pattern more efficiently : try playing the fiveadiddle against a regular 4-4 groove with your right side, and/or play the paradiddle with your right side, and then only apply the 'accents' with your left--so you can more easily acquire the feel of it--you know, 1 2 1 2 3, 1 2 1 2 3. Word.
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Old 06-17-2004, 06:41 PM   #9
Lad.
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I don't know.
The one thing that would help me learn that pattern is knowing what hits are at the same time, and memorizing the pattern.
It's simple, and complex, both at the same time.
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Old 07-22-2004, 05:05 PM   #10
PiXiE
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Talking

Hey laddy.....
well, i know you've heard this from every one else but you do need a teacher! my instructor is fantastic, he gets taught by grant collins and can show you techniques after techniques. he'lh teach anyone and everyone any style they want. He teaches me almost all of them! He is a great guy and a fantastic teacher. If your not i8n our area i can find you an acceptionally great instructor. So yea...PM me if you want more info! And also if you want to learn to read drumm music i can help...i know i'm a chik but i can blow away most guys i know with what i know!
Good luck with your drumming!
Later days.
Luv. PiXiE!!
P.s you can start learning from yourself as soon as you start reading music...once you can read it (it's not hard at all) you start thinking of your own grooves and writing them down or you just use guesswork and write down somethin off the top of your head and pretty soon (after some alterations) its a really funky beat!

Last edited by PiXiE : 07-22-2004 at 05:15 PM. Reason: i forgot something
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Old 07-23-2004, 08:49 AM   #11
Johnny
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I'd be very careful about thinking you've got the simple groove playing down. Can you do what Jim Keltner does? Probably not.
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Old 07-23-2004, 09:31 AM   #12
GreenPremier
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny
I'd be very careful about thinking you've got the simple groove playing down. Can you do what Jim Keltner does? Probably not.


Don't be so naive Johnny. Sure it can be more difficult to play than we think, but it's what we all learned first, most of us. Simple playing is easiest because it requires the least technical ability in terms of endurance and speed and mere chops. It's not playing some crazy fill in 4/4 when we accidently release an 8th note early or late. It's just laying back and grooving.
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Old 07-23-2004, 10:12 AM   #13
Johnny
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Yeah, sorry to be so naive. You boys just keep doing what you're doing. Good luck with that.
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Old 07-23-2004, 10:46 AM   #14
GreenPremier
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny
Yeah, sorry to be so naive. You boys just keep doing what you're doing. Good luck with that.


Okay, you can go on thinking you're better than everyone else. You have fun with that
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Old 07-23-2004, 11:11 AM   #15
Johnny
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I don't think I'm better than anyone; I was trying to help the young man out with some advice that might help him get some work. You called me naive for that. How often do you gig? How many years have you been a working drummer?
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