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View Full Version : Tim's Video is Out!


peter
05-30-2004, 09:08 PM
OK, guys...

Keep the minds open and notice who's
watching Tim on the kick.

His video is finally out. It turns out that
this is exactly where I have been going
with my approach.

Keep your minds open.

http://www.worldsfastestdrummer.com/

Let's talk.

quitou
05-30-2004, 09:58 PM
I watched the preview for his video, and I think it looks pretty cool...what Tim pulls off is amazing...being able to play that fast with his feet is absolutley mind boggling...on the clip it shows his approach to playing fast doubles...very cool...tim may not be a huge drumming name, but if you want to learn how to play fast with your feet, why not learn from that fastest guy on the planet....

oh ya, on the video clip, they show Tim playing doubles using the drumometer and there's a huge crowd watching him....and take a wild guess who was front and center watching Tim wail away....VIRGIL!!!

DerNeue
05-31-2004, 02:15 AM
He is unbelievable fast!
But on the other hand I wonder if it is useful in any musical context. I mean this speed is just amazing! But I much more prefer drummers that are not only technicians. A drummer has to have a certain feel towards music. It is a way of expressing yourself. So I think Virgil has choosen the right path. He concentrates on the music as an art and is not only a technical freak.

ludwig-shin
05-31-2004, 03:18 AM
ok.....amazing!! and i want to know that Joey Jordison[slipknot],i download the gtp..and i saw that he plays the doubles,,very fast and this is not just amazing but is useful...how do you think of him???

peter
05-31-2004, 08:28 AM
As I see it, making it useful in a musical
context is still up to us, as it always is.
We make the bridge from technique to
'feel' and 'application'.

Let me suggest that what Tim is doing is
showing what can be done - the distrib-
uting of stroke responsibilities from the
left to the right foot...

Ask yourself what and how the applic-
ations for the double-stroke on the hands
can contribute to your presentation.

Is it just the double-stroke roll that you
use in the application? ;)

You will see that it goes a lot further than
that. An idea known is different than an
idea applied and an idea applied one way
is just that.

TRUST ME. IT CAN BE APPLIED IN DIFFER-
ENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT RESULTS!

After all, look at our mentor.

mr sonicfeet
06-30-2004, 12:21 PM
Everyone needs to keep in mind Tim's pedals are set up different from the competitions to real live playing. It would be very hard to do a "dynamic" gig that has speed changes. With a double pedal that has industrial strength springs and beaters a couple inches from the head. And good luck trying to go from heel down to heel up. You need the springs on medium for that.

peter
06-30-2004, 02:26 PM
I have different springs and some emulate
what Tim's got set-up. It's not as hard as
it seems. You just have to be ready for the
tension. I tried it for some time, actually.

After a year or so, my chins developed a
LOT but I felt more comfortable after I
set the springs back to normal and also,
I found that my control increased very
much so. Now, I use Axis lighter gauge
springs, along with those that came on
the Eliminator.

Be creative and try it all, seeing what
you might like.

D. Slam
07-08-2004, 05:14 PM
As I see it, making it useful in a musical
context is still up to us, as it always is.
We make the bridge from technique to
'feel' and 'application'.

Let me suggest that what Tim is doing is
showing what can be done - the distrib-
uting of stroke responsibilities from the
left to the right foot...

Ask yourself what and how the applic-
ations for the double-stroke on the hands
can contribute to your presentation.

Is it just the double-stroke roll that you
use in the application? ;)

You will see that it goes a lot further than
that. An idea known is different than an
idea applied and an idea applied one way
is just that.

TRUST ME. IT CAN BE APPLIED IN DIFFER-
ENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT RESULTS!

After all, look at our mentor.

I agree with Pete. There is a phrase I like to use in speaking of anything we learn in drumming or with any instrument for that matter. I call it 'Practical Application'. Can everything you do on the drumkit be applied practically in a a given musical situation? If not, then it's nothing more than fluff.

There is nothing wrong with having this kind of ability though. And like Peter said, What we do with it is up to us... Personally I'm of the belief that you can never have too much 'technique'! It's the concept behind it that will tell the tale. 'Technique' in itself has never hurt anyone, but rather one's idea of what to do with it.

Let's face it. It takes a ton of 'technique' to do what Virgil does. If you want to play like that, you gotta come wit' it!

Notice I put the word "technique" in those little quote marks(' '). The reason for this is I've always felt the term is used much too loosely. EVERYTHING we do requires technique I dont care if it's just to pick your nose. And there's really only two kinds, bad and good.

For some reason, I wasn't able to veiw any video, I just got the audio portion, even That was amazing. I do understand however that what he does only makes him fast and not necessarily a good drummer. :cool:

D.

D. Slam
07-08-2004, 05:46 PM
Everyone needs to keep in mind Tim's pedals are set up different from the competitions to real live playing. It would be very hard to do a "dynamic" gig that has speed changes. With a double pedal that has industrial strength springs and beaters a couple inches from the head. And good luck trying to go from heel down to heel up. You need the springs on medium for that.

Mr. Sonicfeet,

Again I wasn't able to view the video so I didn't see this. I'm glad I read your post because you make a good point. I'm of the business of making music, and If I gotta go through all this hardware manipulation just to play fast, then why bother?!

D.

D. Slam
07-09-2004, 10:31 AM
Mr. Sonicfeet,

Again I wasn't able to view the video so I didn't see this. I'm glad I read your post because you make a good point. I'm of the business of making music, and If I gotta go through all this hardware manipulation just to play fast, then why bother?!

D.

Ok, Just got the hook up so I could see AND hear the video.... Looks legit to me! The technique in itself definately looks like one you can use to improve your foot speed on any setup that you have. It might not get you a world record but so what?!... I'm sold.

D.

rythmtroll
07-09-2004, 01:39 PM
I couldnt find it on the page you gave us. Where the fuck is it man!!!!. I can never find shit on the internet. Im gay by the way...uhh so where is the video!!!

peter
07-09-2004, 01:43 PM
Doubles are useful. They are. They are.
You use them all the time. Developing
good double-strokes can only benefit
your presentation. This Sunday, I am
going to be using part of the double-
stroke routine in a legit funk tune. It
will be fast and it will be musical!

Technique is not necessarily a bad
thing! Remember that.

rythmtroll
07-09-2004, 01:50 PM
DUDE THE VIDEO IS FUCKED UP. IT KEEPS SKIPPING!!!! What a joke. Well thanks anyway.

D. Slam
07-09-2004, 04:48 PM
DUDE THE VIDEO IS FUCKED UP. IT KEEPS SKIPPING!!!! What a joke. Well thanks anyway.

Maybe it's your player, or your connection rythmtroll. It didn't skip on me.

D. Slam
07-09-2004, 04:51 PM
Doubles are useful. They are. They are.
You use them all the time. Developing
good double-strokes can only benefit
your presentation. This Sunday, I am
going to be using part of the double-
stroke routine in a legit funk tune. It
will be fast and it will be musical!

Technique is not necessarily a bad
thing! Remember that.

Eliminate the word "necessarily" and you'll have hit the nail square Peter. Actually, you're right! Technique can be bad when improperly executed.

D.

peter
07-09-2004, 05:12 PM
Don,

You got me! LOL